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Iron Horse Blog

Tarin Teno
 
February 12, 2016 | Tarin Teno

In The Mood for Love - Perfect Pairings For Valentine’s Day

When something is meant to be, it comes easily. Effortless, perfect pairings are on our mind this Valentine’s Day. Since matching people is decidedly more challenging than picking the ideal Iron Horse bottle for a magical moment - say a sip of sparkling with a sumptuous bite, we’re taking on the latter in a display of our affection for you. So, as you embark upon the all-consuming act of kindling love new or tried and true  this Valentine’s Day, Iron Horse & our team of expert friends are here to provide fuel for your sensory expression of devotion.

 

 

Leslie Sbrocco, co-founder of WineToday.com was nothing short of poetic when we called her up to chat about the topic. The expert whose resume includes a James Beard Award, three Emmy’s and three Taste Awards, was travelling to a Today Show segment touting Valentine’s wine menu suggestions when she told us, “It’s very easy to fall in love with Iron Horse wines that’s for sure.” From there we were off to the races.,  “ I’m sure many a romance has been started and nurtured over bottles of Iron Horse bubbles.” When Leslie thinks of this holiday, she always thinks about bubbles first, specifically rosé bubbly. (In fact, our expert has honored her love of rosé bubbles with a tattoo!).

 

 

Leslie says she would start her evening with our 2008 Brut Rose, which is bold and exciting and surprisingly dry. In terms of food pairings, she is a big fan of potato chips and popcorn. “I recommend styling a playful popcorn bar. Pop up your favorite popcorn and pour on truffle oil with sea salt and cracked pepper. This goes beautifully with the Rose or the 2012 Wedding Cuvee. If you want spicy, add peanut oil and paprika. I’ve even tried Espelette peppers from my recent trip to Basque country.” An enticing, spicy spread to woo your lover.

 

When Leslie thinks in terms of preparing a main course, the Iron Horse UnOaked Chardonnay (lovingly described as “naked chardonnay”) is a very easy match for food. Our winemaker agrees. In fact, David’s affinity for this new vintage feels a lot like new love. Anyone who goes to visit him after a trip to our tasting room has heard him describe the 2014 production as our best ever. Leslie advises something as simple as picking up a whole roast chicken at the market and preparing a quick and easy Dijon sauce as an accompaniment. You won’t break a sweat…. until you want to of course!

 

And chocolate. There must be chocolate! How can one avoid its allure?? Leslie certainly goes in for the kill when guiding this denouement to the Valentine’s Day experience. “Iron Horse’s 2012 Estate Pinot Noir pairs with darker chocolate because it’s fruity and not overly tanic, a role  taken care of bythe chocolate.” She suggests a more bittersweet style with higher cacao concentration. She would personally select our Rose which can hold up against this richness. A creative pairing on her recent trip to Sydney led to her final dessert suggestion. “Everyone knows about chocolate dipped strawberries during this season. But I recently had seedless red and green grapes coated in dark chocolate and white respectively. The green grapes with white chocolate goes extremely well with Chardonnay.” Go ahead, be bold!

 

Our next expert, David Glancy of San Francisco Wine School, explained his take on St. Valentine celebrations. His trick for readers exploring their own pairing selection is to keep things simple. When chosen properly, the perfection of your pairing (and your date!) should be the standout. For the wine, he regularly declares something we feel passionate about as well -- “Sparkling is NEVER wrong!” He recommends crafting a sparkling tasting which can progress along with your meal. This starts with our 2012 Wedding Cuvee which is pale golden rosé and dangerously easy to drink, next onto our 2008 Brut Rosé, and finally onto a more mature vintage, like Iron Horse 2000 Brut LD. For those looking to stick with just one option through the meal, he agrees with Leslie on the point that Brut Rosé is phenomenally versatile.

 

When David thinks about a main course, he turns to our UnOaked Chardonnay as well. Due to the crispness of a wine that’s all about the purity of the fruit rather than the “smack of oak” as Leslie described it, he would recommend pairing a medium weight food with some creamy components. This could be anything from a brie cheese or a cream sauce. Or he would advise a second angle which is to look for fresh and crisp things to match. “Oysters on a half shell or a progression into a baked oysters and oysters Rockefeller would be great here. In fact any type of shellfish is appropriate - the in-season Dungeness crab would be a fantastic way to go.” The Iron Horse 2012 Estate Pinot Noir has a unique finish thanks to the col, foggy climate in our Green Valley. According to David, this distinctive, delicious and versatile red would go well with fish, poultry, and meat. “Salmon is a sure thing. Seared Ahi tuna could also stand up, , especially with a pepper crust. And the bright acidity of the wine could cut through the fattiness of a duck dish. Choose a sauce with red fruit and the Pinot will pop.”

 

To wrap up his expert guidance, David advises not to discount the power of an experiential theme. He once had a lovely lunch in the  Iron Horse gazebo featuring tomatoes sourced from Barry Sterling’s renowned vegetable garden, served with our Chardonnay. “The match didn’t necessarily follow any of the food pairing theories that we teach, but it was that fresh crisp cool climate California Chardonnay with a succulent and slightly acidic tomato that pulled me in,  amidst the beautiful setting.” We encourage you to mine your past experiences, replicate a moment ripe with nostalgia. The result, though perhaps not “by the book” has the potential to seduce.

 

And trust us on the sparkling.

 

Go get em Tiger!

 

 

 

*****

Time Posted: Feb 12, 2016 at 4:48 PM
Joy Sterling
 
July 2, 2015 | Joy Sterling

The Drought Hits Home

With the start of summer, the drought has been hitting closer and closer to home … and then, suddenly, it is home. 
 
 
Wells are starting to go dry in nearby Forestville. Up until now, I have felt relatively secure that the North Bay (Marin, Sonoma, Napa) is experiencing nothing more than a “severe drought.” This classification is a level five on the seven levels of severity. Therefore, in a small way I have considered our vineyard as more fortunate when compared with other parts of the state, like Fresno, which is suffering “extraordinary drought.”
 
Since I last blogged on this topic, the State Water Resouces Control Board approved an emergency regulation aimed at protecting the threatened Coho Salmon and Steelhead. Ordinances affect about 13,000 properties in the watersheds of Dutch Bill Creek, Green Valley Creek, which bisects Iron Horse, Mark West Creek and Mill Creek. Water users in these watersheds, i.e. us, will be subject to: 1) enhanced conservation measures built on existing statewide water restrictions 2) regular submission of reports detailing surface and groundwater use. (Note: Below is a photo of our creek from May 2013. It shows water … today it is just muddy.)
 
 
The center of this issue goes beyond the mandatory reporting of diversions, focusing on the very definition of a diversion.  According to a draft of the emergency regulation:
  • Diversions” means all water diverted or pumped from surface waters or from subsurface waters that are hydraulically connected to the surface stream within the 
watersheds.
  • All subsurface water is considered hydraulically connected to the surface stream if 
pumping that water may contribute to a reduction in stream stage or flow of any 
surface stream within the watersheds.
 
For the first time ever we will monitor and report on our groundwater use, filing what we have diverted with the State Water Boards.
 
Really this just means more paperwork. Historically, we only divert water from the creek when the water level is high enough for the health of the fish. Our Iron Horse family has been working with Fish & Wildlife officials since last November to remove any barriers preventing fish from commuting up and down stream.  To support our joint efforts, we have significantly reduced our diversions.  In 2013 we pumped 8 acre/feet, in 2014 just 2.75, and in 2015, none … so as not to endanger the hatchlings seeded by Fish & Wildlife.  We love the salmon and do everything we can to help them navigate Green Valley Creek.
 
This makes us more reliant on the fruits of our conservation efforts including recycled water and winery grey water which goes to the reservoir for the vineyards, gardens and landscaping.  This reservoir is just about full - re-charged by advanced treated water from Forestville. We are installing meters on our wells and our houses. We are mowing more frequently in the vineyards to preserve the cover crop and keep it from competing with the vines. We pruned and have been thinning shoots to reduce water needs of the vines. (Below - a picture of the vegetable garden, irrigated with advanced treated water.)
 
 
Good news is that at least in May, we celebrated residential water use wins as shared in the Los Angeles Times. Urban areas reported a 29% drop in usage which is the biggest monthly decline yet since Gov. Jerry Brown ordered mandatory cuts. But officials caution that these efforts will have to ramp up as the warmer months become more exaggerated, we need six consistent months of similar water use declines to see serious impact.  
 
As experts admit, overall water usage this summer is anyone's guess and is largely dependent on the heat.  Every drop counts - a philosophy that has been embraced by everyone at Iron Horse. In fact, my brother is growing a “drought beard” to proactively “repurpose” water normally used  while shaving.
 
As for our beloved California salmon
 
We spend a good part of the year waiting for summer, which heralds the return of wild king salmon, considered by many to be Sonoma’s “National Dish”.
 
 
State and federal wildlife agencies have been transporting the new generation of baby fish via tanker truck to San Francisco Bay. Due to the drought, rivers and streams have become too shallow or too warm for salmon to navigate and survive the journey to the Pacific.
 
The salmon transport has been in progress since February, with 35,000 gallon tanker trucks being used to transport salmon along the 90 minute journey from hatcheries to the ocean via the freeway to bypass dried-up riverbeds.
 
In the next few years, we will start to see the effect of the drought on fish in the ocean. Warmer water makes the fish harder to catch because they’re not concentrated in their normal areas.  And we don’t yet know how many fish have reproduced in the rivers and creeks … and how many will make it back.
 
The Salmon’s Life Cycle:
 
The fish swim up the river and spawn, those baby salmon grow into smolts and work their way down to the ocean within a year or two. They spend five or six years in the ocean, and then they go back up the river they were born in to spawn again and die. If there’s no water, they can’t swim downstream to the ocean or back upstream to reproduce. We’re affected by the water conditions from five or six years ago. So we’ll see the effects of the drought in the next few years.
 
Nutritional Value:
 
California wild and natural King Salmon is considered by many to be the finest member of the salmon family and extremely nutritious. “Fast” food facts:
  • less than 200 calories per 3-ounce portion
  • excellent source of quality protein (21 grams, 47% of the Recommended Daily Intake)
  • low in saturated fat and sodium
  • rich in vitamins and minerals
  • ocean-run California King salmon is also very rich in omega-3 fatty acids
 
Versatility:

 

Salmon can be grilled, baked, broiled, poached, microwaved, sautéed, smoked, canned, or eaten raw in sushi and as sashimi. It can be prepared with any of your favorite seasonings or marinades: simple or exotic, homemade or store-bought. Don’t think of it as only an entree; it can also be featured in chowders and soups, pastas, appetizers, salads and sandwiches.  And most importantly, it pairs beautifully with Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and bubbly!

 

 
Iron Horse Favorite Recipe: Whole Roasted Salmon in a Crust of Sea Salt

 

Ingredients:

1-8Lb. Salmon, gutted, scaled and trimmed
salt and pepper
1 bunch fresh thyme
several fresh bay leaves
6 Lb. sea salt
extra virgin olive oil
zest of 4 lemons, finely chopped
Serves: 8 people
 
Directions:

 

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Wash fish thoroughly, inside and out, and pat dry. Season the cavity of the fish with salt and pepper, the thyme and bay leaves.
Spread half the sea salt on the bottom of a large baking dish or half sheet tray. Place the fish and completely cover it from head to tail with the remaining salt. Put in the oven and bake 10 minutes per pound.
Remove from oven and let rest for 5 minutes. Brush away as much salt as possible from the fish. Then, using a sharp knife, gently remove and discard skin. With a thin spatula, remove the filets from along the backbone, place on a serving platter and drizzle with olive oil and lemon zest.
Serve with Iron Horse 2013 Chardonnay, 2012 Pinot Noir and/or 2011 Summer’s Cuvee

 

 
######

 

Time Posted: Jul 2, 2015 at 3:05 PM
Joy Sterling
 
April 13, 2015 | Joy Sterling

Springing Forward with the Iron Horse Vegetable Garden

For those who have been to Iron Horse Vineyards, you know our Green Valley enterprise is a family affair.  I run the front of the house, my brother is in charge of operations in the vineyards, and my parents set the standards. We all pitch in where extra hands are needed, but there is one role where exclusive credit is due. And that’s the role of Vegetable Garden CEO.
 

For years, my father has presided over a massive, roving vegetable garden with help from First Lieutenant Jose Puga who has assisted from the beginning. The garden has “gone viral” and now boasts over 300 varieties of tomatoes alone.  The living exhibit of deliciousness rotates to different locations on the property, and this year the open field behind my house is playing host. Because of my proximity to the project, I will be regularly tracking growth on the blog!
 

Everything is started from seed but won't go into the ground until we are past frost season. Normally we worry about frost as late June 1st. But this year, everything is three weeks ahead, so the planting date is approaching.

 

Here are some of my dad’s top tips for starting a successful garden:
 
Q: First, explain the origins of your passion for gardening.
A: Living in France in the '60s was a real eye opener for me. In those days, in  California, we didn’t have access to the variety of fresh vegetables and fruits that we encountered in Europe. For example, we had mainly two types of lettuce - iceburg and romaine, and we thought that was advanced. I remember the luncheon at the Savoy Hotel in London where I first had a mache salad.
 
We took the opportunity to immerse ourselves in the old world, which was new to us. We got very used to having fresh produce from the local markets every morning which generated an early “farm-to-table” menu. It was very exciting. When we moved back home from Europe, we couldn’t find the things that we’d grown accustomed to. So we simply decided to grow them!
 
To that end, on return visits to France, we made a point of shopping for seeds to continue growing the diversity in our Sonoma garden. Across from Notre Dame, there were two blocks of stalls along the river  devoted to seeds. We could also find them in the South of France, near the flower market in Nice.
 
Q: What is the size and scope of the garden this year?
A: The vegetable garden will be about two acres. I need a lot of room! The size is necessary for the  diversity that I’m committed to.
 
Q: What’s new and exciting this season’s garden?
A: There are always some new things to try. I have a special enthusiasm for my tomatoes, but in order to save space for new things, I limit myself to 300 types of tomatoes. And I’m constantly refining my collection to allow for new varieites to enter the garden’s repertoire.
 
Charentais melons have always been one of my specialities, a product indigenous to Provence. I’m also starting fresh with new artichokes this spring. For me, the “excitement factor” is delivered by innovations in produce color, flavor, and shape. It’s the ever evolving variety that keeps me passionate and engaged. Any one vegetable can have a number of different textures, colors, and styles. Years ago, most items had one color - like white cauliflower, green beans and red beets. Now you get a gorgeous range of colors for some if the classics. One of our favorites last year was beautiful golden cauliflower.We now make the most delicious beet chips, sweeter than potatoe chips, made from white beets.
 
Food really is more exciting now than ever.
 
Q: What environmental considerations do you keep in mind on the estate?
A: It’s important to rotate crops so you don’t play out your land. We rotate our garden on the property every couple of years.
I have farming in my blood passed down from several generations. One set of grandparents were homsteaders in Alberta, Canada. My mother's family grew walnuts in San Juan Capistrano. My father grew grapefuit and dates in the Coachella Valley, so I have always had ties to the land, a love of the land, and we work towards a better understanding of sustainable farming principles. No chemicals. We weed with old fashioned, long handled hoes and irrigate with recycled water using drip hoses.
 
Q: How has the vegetable garden added to the overall richness of the Iron Horse estate?
A: Variety is the spice of life. Nothing tastes quite like our home grown tomatoes. We firmly believe the fruits and vegetables we grow here naturally pair beautifully with our wines - terroir and terroir.  The enthusiasm has touched every member of my family.  My children and grandchildren have all participated in the garden planning and tasks at some point.
 
Q: What are your top tips for the at-home grower?
A: As you sketch out the garden and pick your seeds, you can start planting certain items in a hot house to get them going. It’s important to be aware of your climate’s limitation. For us, we can still get frost through the end of spring, so getting a head start is key. I also grow three seedlings  for each of 300 types of tomato I will plant and then only plant out the strongest one of each varitety in the ground. Right now, that means I have 900 tomato plants that we are raising. This is to insure we have a succesful crop.
 
My top tip is to get a hot house. These days you can purchase a self assembling, small hot house. Getting that head start is worth-while.
 
Q: What are some of your favorite sources of seeds for those who need a little guidance?
A: There are marvellous catalogues and exchanges like “Seed Savers” and “The Territorial Seed Company” and "Totally Tomatoes". Here in Sonoma County, Petaluma has the "Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company"store inside a grand old bank bnuilding, which has a beautiful selection comparable to my old haunts in Paris.  Every year, these sources bring a few options that end up as permanent "favorites" in the planting schedule. The hard part is being restricted to just 300 kinds of tomatoes.